Events

Name Description
Andean Bear Elusive yet charismatic, Andean Bears are the only surviving species of bear native to South America, and the last remaining of the short-faced bears in the world. Experts predict that that Andean Bears will be considered endangered in the next 20 years. Research on bear distribution and numbers is needed to design effective conservation strategies for this threatened species. The Andean Bear Conservation Alliance represents a collaborative, coordinated, and efficient approach to the conservation of the Andean bear throughout its range. ABCA is a partnership initiative of the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, in collaboration with the IUCN Bear Specialist Group and other partners working to create range-wide conservation plans for the Andean bear.

Learn more about how to help Andean Bears

FFW Andean Bear Conservation One Sheet
Asian Turtle
Nearly 1/3 of all and freshwater turtle and tortoise species are found in Asia and are threatened by large-scale, unsustainable trade for sale in food markets and traditional medicine.

Learn more about how to help Asian Turtles

FFW Asian Turtle Conservation One Sheet
Elephant
The world’s largest land mammal, African elephants have long stood as symbols of wildlife’s majesty. However, habitat loss, conflict with humans, poaching and the illegal wildlife trade now threaten the species’ survival. African elephants numbered 1.2 million in 1980, but in the past 36 years, their population has decreased by 65 percent. Poachers, usually seeking elephants’ valuable ivory tusks, kill about 96 elephants every day – totaling between 30,000 and 38,000 every year. Elephants are one of several species threatened by the illegal wildlife trade, alongside rhinos, tigers and slow loris. This trade, like other illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts, is controlled by dangerous international criminal networks, and has been linked to terrorism and the trafficking of drugs, arms and people.

Learn more about how to help Elephants

FFW Elephant Conservation One Sheet
Giraffe Giraffe are one of the most recognized and beloved animals on the planet. Surprisingly, their numbers are declining across Africa – the population has decreased by nearly 40% in the last 15 years. Poaching, habitat loss, and disease continue to threaten existing giraffe populations. In partnership with the Giraffe Conservation Foundation (GCF) we are working to secure a future for all giraffe populations by promoting giraffe conservation and supporting innovative research, conservation and management to better understand giraffe ecology, genetics, conservation and management.

Learn more about how to help Giraffe

FFW Giraffe Conservation One Sheet
Gorilla
Gorillas are powerful yet shy and intelligent. Eastern gorillas (Grauer’s and mountain gorillas) are severely affected by human activity. They are hunted and their habitat is being lost to mining and agriculture. Only 850 mountain gorillas remain in two populations in Rwanda, Uganda, and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Fewer than 3500 Grauer’s gorillas remain in DRC.

Learn more about how to help Gorilla

FFW Gorilla Conservation One Sheet
Lion & Cheetah
Lion populations have decreased by more than 40% in the last 20 years, and are likely to half again in the next two decades unless a major conservation effort is mounted to save them. Central to protecting lions is supporting the human communities that share their home turf in Tanzania’s Ruaha landscape, a globally important region for carnivore conservation. In partnership with the Ruaha Carnivore Project, we are working to develop effective, long-term conservation strategies for lions and other large carnivore in Tanzania. Learn more about the threats that lions face, and how you can join our efforts to save them.

Learn more about how to help Lion & Cheetah

FFW Lion and Cheetah Conservation One Sheet
Rhino
Once found throughout sub-Saharan Africa, black rhinos used to be a common feature of the savannah. However, poaching and the illegal wildlife trade now threaten the species’ survival. Between 1970 and 1992, poaching caused 96 percent of black rhinos to disappear, leaving just 2,475 wild black rhinos in 1993. Since then, conservation and anti-poaching efforts have doubled the size of the black rhino population, but the species remains critically endangered. One of four subspecies, the West African black rhino, was declared extinct in 2011. Rhinos are one of several species threatened by the illegal wildlife trade, alongside elephants, tigers and slow loris. This trade, like other illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts, is controlled by dangerous international criminal networks, and has been linked to terrorism and the trafficking of drugs, arms and people.

Learn more about how to help Rhino

FFW Rhino Conservation One Sheet
Slow Loris Hailing from Southeast Asia, the slow loris is one of the rarest primates on earth. The illegal wildlife trade has decreased slow lorises’ numbers to a dangerous low. With its big, brown eyes, small size and soft fur, the slow loris has become a popular, exotic pet, featured several viral, online videos being tickled (this is actually torture for the loris, which is demonstrating a sign of extreme distress in these videos). The demand for slow lorises has encouraged poachers to illegally trap and sell the primates, often clipping their teeth for humans’ safety and killing the slow lorises in the process. Thousands of slow lorises are poached each year for use in traditional medicine as well: their body parts and tonics are believed to help treat leprosy, heal childbirth wounds, cast curses and make love potions in countries such as Cambodia and Sri Lanka. The slow loris is one of several species threatened by the illegal wildlife trade, alongside elephants, tigers and rhinos.

Learn more about how to help Slow Loris

FFW Slow Loris Conservation One Sheet
Tiger
Tiger numbers have decreased by 50% in the past 30 years and four of the nine subspecies of tiger have disappeared. Amur, Sumatran and Malayan tiger populations are all estimated at less than 500 animals. In partnership with the Tiger Conservation Campaign (TCC) we are focusing efforts on the three most threatened tigers, including the endangered Amur tiger in the Russian Far East.

Learn more about how to help Tigers

FFW Tiger Conservation One Sheet